DIVISION OF

COMMUNICATION AND FINE ARTS

Andrus, Armstrong, Dromi, Edwards, Goehner, K. Gould, Holland, Martin, Peer, Pohle, E. Roebuck, M. Smith, P. Smith, Snediker, Whitley, J. Wubbena, T. Wubbena (chair)

The Division of Communication and Fine Arts is comprised of the Departments of Communication, Music, and Visual Arts. Bachelor's degrees are offered in Art and IllustrationCommunication, Digital Cinema, General Music, Graphic DesignMusic, Music Education, Photography, and Worship Arts. Minors are offered in all areas, as well as Drama.

The mission of the Division of Communication and Fine Arts is to teach, nurture, and model excellence and integrity in creativity, scholarship, spiritual formation, and professional development.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION

(SYMBOL: COM)

The Department of Communication’s educational mission is to create a learning environment in which students develop the skills, knowledge, and abilities necessary to use communication to create a better world. Through Christian love, the department advocates ways of communicating that is rooted in an acceptance and appreciation of others. Students communicate in ways that express respect for and acknowledgment of others regardless of their station in life, wealth or lack of it, politics, religion, ethnicity, race, or any other quality.

Student Learning Outcomes:


The Department of Communication has identified the following seven student learning outcomes:

1.  Students will be able to think clearly, critically, and creatively in response to communication problems.

2.  Students will express ideas in oral, written, and mediated messages that are coherent, persuasive, and ethical.

3.  Students will demonstrate the communication skills necessary to engage in personal, professional, civic, and
social relationships.

4.  Students will adapt oral, visual, written, and mediated messages to diverse audiences across multiple platforms.

5.  Students will analyze and evaluate verbal and nonverbal messages in differing social, political, and cultural contexts
in order to assess their effectiveness.

6.  Students will use current technology related to the communication field.

7.  Students will work productively in groups and teams on a range of communication projects.


The Department of Communication celebrates the centrality of communication in human life through promoting effective communication across many contexts and through multiple media methods.

Varying contexts require different methods and styles of communication. Required core courses teach students human and mediated communication in a variety of contexts. Communication majors combine theory with practice. Students are encouraged to pursue their own communication interests as they seek to impact an increasingly diverse and global society.

Communication majors are well-prepared for effective communication work in media industries, business, non-profit organizations and ministries that require excellent written, interpersonal, organizational, oral, and/or media production skills.  Creative Christian leadership is emphasized, preparing students for careers in both faith-based and secular communication fields.  Local, national, and international internship and mission trip opportunities allow participating students to further develop a global perspective.

Additionally, students in the Department of Communication are actively engaged in the John Brown University community.  JBU Communication students produce the award-winning student newspaper, The Threefold Advocate.  Students work with online radio station MyPositiveEdge.com, and at JBU's professional radio station KLRC 90.9 FM. As part of Golden Eagle Television Productions, students produce live video coverage of JBU home basketball games, and take on roles including directing, camerawork, play-by-play and color commentary. The department sponsors speech and debate competition through its award-winning forensics team, and the drama program produces two plays each year through the department's theatre workshops.  All of these co-curricular programs are open to any JBU student, not just Communication majors.

Emphasis Options


Majors may shape their program with an advisor or choose to concentrate their study within one of the following areas of emphasis:

The Digital Journalism Emphasis offers students a chance to learn writing, information gathering and reporting, formatting, editing, anchoring, and producing for both traditional digital and media platforms.  Among the tools that students use to report live are some of the latest technologies, such as Twitter© and Skype©.  Students also study critical issues faced in today's complex communications environment.  "Hands-on" experience is emphasized in the digital journalism curriculum.

The Public Relations Emphasis provides students with instruction in the principles, processes, skills, and management of public relations programs designed to attain or maintain inter-organizational or social accord.  Students learn both the basic skills of writing, graphics, and oral presentation, as well as the managerial functions of planning, research, campaign development, and evaluation.  The program prepares students with a solid ethical foundation, an awareness of diversity and multiculturalism, and an understanding of the use of social media for strategic engagement with an organization's many audiences or publics.

The Radio/TV/Web Emphasis offers students the production skills and industry knowledge necessary to change society through the development of compelling programming.  This emphasis empowers students to become cultural leaders who can succeed in the burgeoning business of creating and distributing content through radio, television, and the Web.  Essential industry courses expand beyond production to teach programming strategies, sales, and media entrepreneurship, plus legal and ethical considerations.  Student-created content is distributed via radio, TV, DVD, and the Web, including live streaming audio/video podcasting, and various streams of social media.

The Social Advocacy Emphasis explores the connections between advocacy, as a pragmatic practice for social change, and rhetoric, as a historical tradition of public argument, within national and local contexts.  Students understand advocacy as a practice that includes public argument and reasoning in multiple contexts as well as how each context demands its own set of unique actions.  Students will learn to assess competing interests within a public issue as well as how to plan local, regional, and national advocacy campaigns.  By the completion of the emphasis, students come to understand advocacy as a necessary part of citizenship.

The Multi-Context Emphasis provides students with the opportunity to become excellent communicators who can speak, write, and use media in a highly effective manner.  Outstanding communication skills prepare students to work in a wide variety of contexts such as business, media, ministry, and non-profit organizations.  Generalists choose courses from at least three of the other department emphases (in consultation with an advisor) to build a program that best suits their goals in the communication field.  Communication majors also choose department co-curricular activities according to their interests.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Communication

1. University Core Curriculum - 55 hours

2. Communication Department Core - 15 hours

COM 1133 Mass Communication and Society

COM 2123 News Writing and Reporting

COM 2433 Diversity and Media Issues

COM 2523 Public Speaking

COM 4293 Communication Law and Ethics

3. Emphases Options:

A.  Digital Journalism Emphasis - 40 hours

      Required Courses for Digital Journalism Emphasis - 27 hours

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

COM 1153 Introduction to Video and Audio Production

COM 1163 Communication Technologies

COM 2333 News Editing

COM 2353 Public Relations Writing and Technology

COM 3153 Advanced Digital Reporting

COM 3363 Magazine Writing

COM 3463 Online Editorial Journalism

COM 4323 Advertising

      Digital Journalism Practicum Electives - 4 hours

COM 2111/12 Practicum in Journalism

COM 3111/12 Advanced Practicum in Journalism

COM 4211/12 Online News Bureau Practicum

      Digital Journalism Internship - 3 hours

COM 4473 Internship in Journalism

      Digital Journalism Supporting Courses - 6 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

At least one of the following:

COM 3453 Social Movements

COM 4253 Integrated Media

COM 4343 Programming and Promotion for Radio/TV/Web

Students may also choose another COM elective with advisor approval

 

B.  Public Relations Emphasis - 41 hours

      Required Courses for Public Relations Emphasis - 30 hours

COM 2343 News Editing for Public Relations

COM 2353 Public Relations Writing and Technology

COM 3363 Magazine Writing

COM 3433 Persuasive Communication

COM 3453 Social Movements

COM 3653 Specialized Writing in Public Relations

COM 4323 Advertising

COM 4373 Online Advocacy

COM 4453 Public Relations Planning

MKT 2143 Principles of Marketing

      Public Relations Practicum Electives - 2 hours

COM 2121 Practicum in Forensics

COM 2111/12 Practicum in Journalism

      Public Relations Internship - 3 hours

COM 4483 Internship in Public Relations

      Public Relations Supporting Courses - 6 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

 

C.  Radio/TV/Web Emphasis - 33 hours

      Required Courses for Radio/TV/Web Emphasis - 25 hours

COM 1101 Beginning Radio Practicum

COM 1153 Introduction to Video and Audio Production

COM 1163 Communication Technologies

COM 1233 Audio Production

COM 2101 Intermediate Radio Practicum

COM 3101 Advanced Radio Practicum

COM 3421 JBU-TV EagleBreak Practicum

COM 3423 EagleBreak

COM 4253 Integrated Media

COM 4333 Advanced Television Production

COM 4343 Programming and Promotion for Radio/TV/Web

      Radio/TV/Web Elective - 3 hours

COM 3153 Advanced Digital Reporting

COM 4323 Advertising

COM 4413 Selected Topics in Radio/TV/Web

      Radio/TV/Web Practicum Electives - 2 hours

COM 1131, 2131 Radio/TV/Web Performance Practicum

COM 2111/12 Practicum in Journalism

COM 2121 Practicum in Forensics

COM 3111/12 Advanced Practicum in Journalism

COM 3121 Radio/TV/Web Sports Practicum

COM 3131 Radio News Practicum

COM 3141 Television Program Assistant

COM 3151 KLRC Program Assistant

COM 3321 Independent Television/Video Production

COM 4172 Sports Broadcasting

COM 4211/12 Online News Bureau Practicum

      Radio/TV/Web Internship - 3 hours

COM 4463 Internship in Radio/TV/Web

 

D.  Social Advocacy Emphasis - 37 hours

      Required Courses for Social Advocacy Emphasis - 27 hours

COM 1163 Communication Technologies

COM 2533 Oral Interpretation

COM 2563 Argumentation and Debate

COM 3433 Persuasive Communication

COM 3453 Social Movements

COM 3543 Rhetoric of Popular Culture

COM 4273 Narrative Performance

COM 4363 Political Communication

COM 4373 Online Advocacy

      Social Advocacy Practicum Electives - 4 hours

COM 2111 Practicum in Journalism

COM 2121 Practicum in Forensics

COM 3121 Radio/TV/Web Sports Practicum

COM 4211 Online News Bureau Practicum

      Social Advocacy Electives - 6 hours

Select six credits of other communication (COM) courses of interest, including practicum.

E.  Multi-Context Emphasis - 27 hours

Students in the Multi-Context Emphasis take courses in any three areas of the Communication Department: Digital Journalism, Radio/TV/Web, Social Advocacy, and/or Public Relations.  Nine hours minimum are required in each of the chosen areas. A total of 15 hours of upper-division courses must be selected.  A minimum of three practicum hours are required.

 

4. Minor field or electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours.

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan

 

Requirements for minor in Communication


The student must successfully complete a minimum of 18 hours.

COM 1133 Mass Communication and Society

COM 2123 News Writing and Reporting

COM 2523 Public Speaking

An additional nine hours from COM in at least two of the Communication emphases of study are required.  At least six hours must be upper-division course work.

 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

(SYMBOL: MUS)

The mission of the John Brown University Department of Music is to facilitate growth toward musical excellence as a means of glorifying God.

Student Learning Outcomes:

The student learning outcomes of the music department are directly tied to education of the head, heart, and hand:

I.   HEAD:  Demonstrate theoretical, historical, and technological competencies in content area.

II.  HEART:  Develop Christ-like character through personal spiritual disciplines and community accountability.

III.  HAND:  Practice intellectual competencies and Christian character through excellence in performance and vocation.

The department is committed to graduating students based on the following student outcomes:

1.  Students will perform literature specific to emphasis and field of study, demonstrating stylistic insight, technical proficiency, musical artistry and a scholarly thought process.

2.  Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of the pre-performance aspects of music through written and aural mediums, based on fundamental theoretical principles.

3.  Students will describe and explain the historical development of music, identifying historical styles and performance practices, musical forms, repertoire of different media, and the lives and contributions of outstanding musicians.

4.  Students will demonstrate a working knowledge and application of technology and software used in various musical platforms and professions.

5.  Students will develop an understanding of key principles, terms and theories in the sub-fields of music and education; and/or demonstrate mastery of these principles on national standardized tests.

6.  Students will develop a personal philosophy of the arts, thinking through the integration of art and faith, the role of the arts in modern society, and the pedagogical responsibilities that come with being an educated artist.

7.  Students will use the professional skills learned to serve the community of JBU and beyond.

For those wishing to follow careers in music and/or worship arts, courses are offered leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music Education. These curricula provide a well-rounded education for those wishing to enter the music profession as artists, teachers, conductors, church worship leaders and tech support, and musicians in other fields. In addition, the degrees in general music are designed for students who want to earn a degree in music with the option to explore other avenues of intellectual inquiry. Students often complete a second major or minor in a field outside music.

All programs in music are closely aligned with work in Bible, liberal arts, and technological departments, also providing students majoring outside the Department of Music the opportunity to study music as a minor or as an elective.

Admission Requirements for the Major/Minor

In addition to satisfying the university's general requirements for admission, all applicants must audition for admission to the Music Program. During the audition, each candidate must demonstrate musical ability and potential, including a good sense of rhythm and the ability to sing in tune.

1. Vocal major/minor audition:

a. Performance of two prepared songs. Suggested works include songs by classical composers (in a foreign language, if possible) and songs from operettas or Broadway musicals.  For Worship Arts majors, one of the two selections may be a praise and worship song.

b. Demonstration of skills at the keyboard or other instrument, as applicable. (Lack of piano skills will not preclude admittance to a music degree program. However, all majors must demonstrate specific piano skills before degree completion. Appropriate classes or private study will be required of all students based on keyboard proficiency.)

c. Sight-reading a short excerpt.

2. Piano or Organ major/minor audition:

a. Performance of two prepared selections from traditional literature, representing contrasting style periods.  For Worship Arts majors, one of the prepared selections may be an arrangement of a praise and worship song or traditional hymn.

b. Prepare four major and four harmonic minor scales.

c. Sight-reading a short excerpt.

3. Instrumental major/minor audition:

a. Performance of two contrasting selections demonstrating lyrical playing and technical proficiency.  Repertoire may include studies, etudes and sonata or concerto literature, classical in nature.  Sample repertoire is that of state solo and ensemble competitions.

b. Playing of major scales through four sharps and four flats demonstrating the full range of the instrument.

c. Sight-reading a short excerpt.

NOTE: Bass players, guitar players, and set drummers may send a recording consisting of a demonstration of playing in contemporary styles and improvising.  Recorded excerpts from ensembles such as jazz bands, combos, and worship teams may be included to demonstrate abilities in ensemble playing.

Students entering during the Fall semester should complete the auditions by April 1. Audition forms are available online at www.jbu.edu/music.

An on-campus audition is preferable both for the student and for the faculty, but in cases where travel to Siloam Springs presents an insurmountable hardship, a recording incorporating the specified audition requirements will suffice. Students accepted on the basis of a recorded audition will need to complete the remainder of the process during the freshman orientation prior to registration. They may be asked to present part of their audition at that time.

Students are advised to complete all aspects of the audition as early in the high school senior year as possible. Those with deficiencies will be so advised, so that they may begin to work in the necessary area(s) before entering the university. Upon entrance, those who have not met the departmental standards may be granted permission by the music faculty to declare a provisional major until such deficiencies are eliminated. Prerequisite work in the major applied area is designated as MUS 09_1 or MUS 0891 and does not count toward the major, the minor, or graduation hours. Once the deficiencies are removed, a student enrolls for degree credit in the applied field (MUS 19_1, 19_2, 1891 or 1892). Students entering with deficiencies in the major applied area typically require nine or ten semesters, rather than the standard eight, to finish the baccalaureate degree. The B.Mus.Ed. is a nine-semester degree: eight semesters of course work and the ninth semester spent in an internship. It is possible to complete the degree in eight semesters only if a student transfers in approved hours.

Transfer students are required to audition for admittance into the music program (see Admission Requirements for the Major/Minor).  Skills in the areas of theory, musicianship, piano/voice and the applied concentration will be assessed at the time of the audition.  Repeating previous course work may be required.

 

Applied Music Scholarships

 

The awarding of a music scholarship is based primarily on performance ability as determined in the audition for admission described above, or on ability demonstrated in ongoing applied instruction. After receiving a scholarship, the student must earn a GPA of 2.0 each semester, a 3.0 GPA in the major applied area, and a 2.5 cumulative GPA to retain the scholarship. Scholarships are reviewed annually and may be adjusted higher or lower based upon the merit of the recipient's academic and applied work.

A student majoring in a music program may expect to retain a scholarship for eight semesters providing the above criteria are met. An exception is made for a student in the music education program who is completing the internship during a ninth semester. If a student fails to meet any portion of the applied scholarship requirements, that student will be placed on probation, but will retain the applied music scholarship for the following semester. At the end of the probationary period, the progress of the student will be reassessed. At such time, the applied music scholarship will either be continued or discontinued.

Applied music scholarships are not available for students minoring in the music program.  Ensemble scholarships may be available to all students.

 

General Requirements for Music Degrees

1. Demonstrated potential. Each candidate must select a major subject (voice, piano, organ, or instrument), meet yearly requirements as set by the music faculty, and fulfill all stated degree requirements. The B.A. with an emphasis in Voice, Piano, or Organ requires that students demonstrate adequate potential in performance before being allowed to pursue this degree program. Official admittance occurs at the end of the second semester of the sophomore year, only upon recommendation of the faculty, after the student has passed the Upper Division Applied Admittance Exam. Students desiring to pursue the performance degree must enroll each term in two-credit applied lessons in the major area.


2. Ensemble participation requirements. Each major is required to participate satisfactorily in at least one ensemble per semester at JBU. (The faculty will grant exceptions to B.Mus.Ed. students during the semester of their internship or to students taking fewer than six hours.) Up to four hours of Accompanying Practicum (after meeting the specified prerequisites) may count as ensemble credit for those whose major instrument is piano. Students may choose music theater, choral, or instrumental groups. Qualified non-majors are encouraged to participate.

3. Recital attendance. Satisfactory completion of MUS 1000 Recital Attendance is required every semester majors are full-time students at JBU.  Students in the B.Mus.Ed. program are exempted the semester of their internship.  Two semesters are required of minors.

4. Recital participation. All majors enrolled in applied lessons are required to perform in a departmental recital in their area of concentration once during the first year of study and at least once each semester thereafter, or at the discretion of the teacher.

5. Jury exams. Counterparts to final exams in lecture courses, juries are scheduled at the end of each semester of applied study. Jury grades assigned by the adjudicators have an impact on the applied course grade, although the final grade is assigned at the discretion of the instructor.

6. Piano Proficiency. Incoming students will be assessed in the area of piano skills, and placed in an appropriate level piano course.  A Piano Proficiency Exam will be administered at the end of Class Piano IV or after the first semester of Applied Piano, whichever occurs first.  All music majors, regardless of degree, must pass each section of the Piano Proficiency Exam.  Students who do not pass the Piano Proficiency will be required to either: (1) repeat Class Piano IV; or (2) enroll in remedial Applied Piano MUS 0991 (with consent of instructor) and pass the proficiency before proceeding to Applied Piano for credit.  Students who do not pass all sections of the Piano Proficiency Exam will not be awarded a music degree.   

The Piano Proficiency Exam is given in seven sections, as follows:

(1) Sight-read a 4-part hymn/chorale; (2) Sight-read a solo piece of early-intermediate level; (3) Play all major scales 4 octaves in eighth notes at a minimum tempo of MM=120 per quarter note, hands together; (4) Play I-IV-I-V65-I chord progression in all keys, major and minor, at a minimum tempo of MM=100 (one chord per beat) ; (5) Harmonize a melody at sight; (6) Play prepared accompaniment of early intermediate level with soloist; (7) Perform a solo piece of early intermediate level (score may be used).

Qualified non-keyboard majors may enroll in piano and organ lessons with an upper-division number (3000+) only after taking four semesters of keyboard and passing the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam.

7. Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam. The Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam is taken by all majors. The exam is taken instead of the jury at the end of the fourth semester of degree credit in the major applied area, and it is twice the length of a usual jury.

The student must pass the "a" part of the exam in the respective applied area (see below) before earning upper-division credit in applied music; if the student does not pass the "a" requirement, the next semester of study is taken for additional lower-division credit.

A student who does not pass the other parts of the exam in the respective applied area may earn upper-division credit in the applied area for the next semester, but will re-take those other parts of the exam at the end of the next semester of study. If the student fails a second time, subsequent applied study will be for lower-division credit until the student passes all remaining parts of the exam.

The same policy applies to transfer students. They must pass the "a" part of the exam in the respective applied area in order to register for upper-division credit for the next semester. If they fail any other parts of the exam not passed on the first attempt, they must re-take those parts of the exam at the end of that semester in order to continue to earn upper-division credit. Otherwise, subsequent applied study will be for lower-division credit until they pass all remaining parts of the exam.

Vocal majors and concentrates are expected to

a. perform four songs or arias (arias count for two songs) from current repertoire by memory in three languages (English, Italian, and German), of varying styles, and demonstrating developing musicality and expressiveness; and

b. demonstrate sight-reading proficiency using techniques learned in musicianship classes.  The difficulty of the music selection corresponds with the amount of completed coursework specific to each degree program.

Piano majors and concentrates are expected to

a. play advanced literature from three of the following style periods: (1) Baroque (Bach WTC or comparable-more difficult than Two-part Inventions); (2) Classical (Beethoven or Mozart sonata or comparable literature); (3) Romantic (Chopin, Brahms); and (4) Impressionistic/20th century (Debussy, Prokofieff). At least one piece or movement is to be completely memorized. The performance of these requirements should be stylistically convincing, and the performer should display a developing sense of musicality and expressiveness;

b. play major, harmonic, and melodic minor scales for four octaves in sixteenth notes at a minimum tempo of MM=120 per quarter note, hands together;

c. play major and minor arpeggios in all inversions for four octaves in sixteenth notes at a minimum tempo of MM=100 per quarter note, hands together;

d. play major and minor cadences (I-IV-I64-V7-I) with right hand in all inversions and left hand in octaves; and

e. sight-read (1) a hymn having three or more sharps or flats in the key signature with intermediate rhythmic complexity and (2) a vocal accompaniment of an early-intermediate level.

Worship Arts piano concentrates are expected to

a. play advanced literature from two of the following style periods: (1) Baroque (Bach WTC or comparable - more difficult than Two-part Interventions); (2) Classical (Beethoven or Mozart sonata or comparable literature); (3) Romantic (Chopin, Brahms); and (4) Impressionistic/20th century (Debussy, Prokofieff).  At least one piece or movement is to be completely memorized. The performance of these requirements should be stylistically convincing, and the performer should display a developing see of musicality and expressiveness;

b. play major, harmonic, and melodic minor scales for four octaves in sixteenth notes at a minimum tempo of MM=100 per quarter note, hands together;

c. play major and minor arpeggios in all inversions for four octaves in sixteenth notes at a minimum tempo of MM=80 per quarter note, hands together;

d. play major and minor cadences (I-IV-I64-V7-I) with right hand in all inversions and left hand in octaves; and

e. sight-read (1) a hymn having three or more sharps or flats in the key signature with intermediate rhythmic complexity; (2) a vocal accompaniment of an early-intermediate level; and (3) a contemporary worship song written on a lead sheet.

 Organ majors and concentrates are expected to

a. play one work from each of these style periods: (1) Baroque, (2) Romantic, and (3) 20th century. The performance of these requirements should be stylistically convincing and the performer should display a developing sense of musicality and expressiveness;

b. play an introduction and two stanzas of a hymn. The stanzas must be played in a contrasting manner, as appropriate for the text;

c. play a hymn transposed up or down a half-step and whole step; and

d. sightread (1) a hymn having three or more sharps or flats in the key signature with intermediate rhythmic complexity and (2) a simple work in trio texture.

Each candidate for the B.A. degree with an emphasis in Organ is also required to earn the Service Playing Certificate (SPC) of the American Guild of Organists before entering upper-division work.

Instrumental concentrates are expected to

a. perform literature and technical exercises as determined by the instrumental instructor.

b. sight-reading as determined by the instrumental instructor.

8. Recital or Presentation.

  • A candidate for the B.A. degree with emphasis in Applied Music Performance is required to present a half recital during the junior year (MUS 3900) and a full recital during the senior year (MUS 4900).  These recitals may not take place during consecutive semesters.
  • A candidate for the B.A. or B.S. degree in General Music has the choice between a half recital during the senior year (MUS 4900) or a Senior Presentation (MUS 4910).  Four hours of upper-division credit in the applied concentration is necessary in order to perform a senior recital.
  • A candidate for the B.Mus.Ed. degree is required to perform a half recital during the senior year (MUS 4900).  
  • A candidate for the B.S. degree in Worship Arts is required to design and execute a corporate worship service (Senior Presentation in Worship Arts MUS 4920).

Recitalists are required to enroll in applied lessons during the semester the recital is scheduled. Similarly, those choosing the Senior Presentation or the Senior Presentation in Worship Arts must enroll in MUS 4191 Senior Presentation Preparation for faculty mentoring.

9. Major Field Test in Music. All majors (except those majoring in Worship Arts) are required to take the Major Field Test in Music as a condition of graduation after completing MUS 4113 and 3223. If one of these courses is taken in the last semester of study, the Major Field Test should be taken as late in the semester as practical.

10. Certification for Organists. All candidates for the B.A. with emphasis in Organ must take the examination for the Colleague Certificate of the American Guild of Organists (CAGO) no later than the beginning of the last semester of study.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Music with emphasis in Organ, Piano, or Voice

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by MUS 1203 in the program requirements.

2. Courses Specified by the Department - 28 hours

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 1203 Liberal Arts Foundations for the Musician

MUS 2111 Musicianship II

MUS 2113 Theory II

MUS 3213 History of Music I

MUS 3223 History of Music II

MUS 3241 Musicianship III

MUS 3243 Theory III

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 3900* Junior Recital

MUS 4103* Music Arranging with MIDI

MUS 4113 Harmonic Form and Analysis

MUS 4900* Senior Recital

3. One of the following Emphases - 31 hours

Voice

MUS 1911 Lyric Diction I

MUS 1921 Lyric Diction II

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41 Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

MUS 1980/3980 Studio Class in Voice (each semester of Applied Voice*)

MUS 1981* Applied Voice: 8 hours

MUS 3981* Applied Voice: 8 hours

MUS 4281 Vocal Literature

MUS 4382 Vocal Pedagogy

Music Theatre - 6 hours from

MUS 1731/3731 Music Theatre Methods: Drama I

MUS 1732/3732 Music Theatre Production

Choral Ensemble: a minimum of two semesters (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Piano

MUS 1991* Applied Piano: 8 hours

MUS 3991* Applied Piano: 8 hours

MUS 1990/3990 Studio Class in Piano (each semester of Applied Piano)

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 2601 Accompanying Class

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

MUS 3601 Music Practicum: Accompanying

MUS 4261 Piano Pedagogy

MUS 4262 Piano Literature

Ensemble Participation: 6 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Organ

MUS 1971* Applied Organ: 8 hours

MUS 3971* Applied Organ: 8 hours

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 1990/3990 Studio Class in Piano (each semester of Applied Organ*)

MUS 2601 Accompanying Class

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

MUS 3611 Music Practicum: Church Organist

MUS 4273 Organ Literature and Pedagogy

Ensemble participation: 6 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

4. Foreign Language - 12 hours

For Voice majors:

LS 1213 Elementary French I

LS 1223 Elementary French II

LS 1313 Elementary German I

LS 1323 Elementary German II

For Piano, Organ, or Instrumental majors:

Twelve hours of LS-1000, LS-2000 level courses; or six hours of LS-2000 level courses

Completion of an intermediate language course meets the Global Studies requirement of the Core Curriculum

5. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan - Voice

View 4-Year Plan - Piano

View 4-Year Plan - Organ

*See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with major in General Music

 1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by MUS 1203 in the program requirements.

2. Courses Specified by this Department - 29 hours

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 1203 Liberal Arts Foundations for the Musician

MUS 2111 Musicianship II

MUS 2113 Theory II

MUS 3213 History of Music I

MUS 3223 History of Music II

MUS 3241 Musicianship III

MUS 3243 Theory III

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 4103* Music Arranging with MIDI

MUS 4113 Harmonic Form and Analysis

Capstone Option A or B:

A. MUS 39_1* or 3891* Applied Lessons

    MUS 4900* Senior Recital (half recital)

B. MUS 4191* Senior Presentation Preparation

    MUS 4910* Senior Presentation

3. One of the following Concentrations - 12 or 13 hours

Voice

MUS 1981* Applied Voice: 4 hours

MUS 1980 Studio Class in Voice: 4 semesters

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Piano

MUS 1991* Applied Piano: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Organ

MUS 1971* Applied Organ: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Instrumental Music (as applied instructors are available)

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument: 4 hours

MUS 1890 Studio Class in Instrumental Music: 4 semesters (as needed and available)

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

MUS 1951 Class Lessons in Voice (or 1 hour of Applied Voice*)

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

3a. Successful completion of the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam in the applied concentration area

Any additional hours in applied area will count as music electives. Any hours taken after passing the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam will be taken at the 3000-level for upper-division credit.  Four hours of upper-division credit is a requirement for performing a senior recital.

4. Choose a minimum of one additional upper-division hour in music if concentrating in voice or instrumental music.

5. Foreign language - 12 hours

For Voice majors:

LS 1213 Elementary French I

LS 1223 Elementary French II

LS 1313 Elementary German I

LS 1323 Elementary German II

For Piano, Organ, or Instrumental majors:

Twelve hours of LS-1000, LS-2000 level courses; or six hours of LS-2000 level courses

Completion of an intermediate language course meets the Global Studies requirement of the Core Curriculum

6. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan - Voice

View 4-Year Plan - Piano-Organ

View 4-Year Plan - Instrumental

* See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in General Music

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by MUS 1203 in the program requirements.

2. Courses Specified by this Department - 29 hours

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 1203 Liberal Arts Foundations for the Musician

MUS 2111 Musicianship II

MUS 2113 Theory II

MUS 3213 History of Music I

MUS 3223 History of Music II

MUS 3241 Musicianship III

MUS 3243 Theory III

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 4103* Music Arranging with MIDI

MUS 4113 Harmonic Form and Analysis

Capstone Option A or B:

A. MUS 39_1* or 3891* Applied Lessons

     MUS 4900* Senior Recital (half recital)

B. MUS 4191* Senior Presentation Preparation

     MUS 4910* Senior Presentation

3. One of the following Concentrations - 12 or 13 hours

Voice

MUS 1981* Applied Voice: 4 hours

MUS 1980 Studio Class in Voice: 4 semesters

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Piano

MUS 1991* Applied Piano: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Organ

MUS 1971* Applied Organ: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Instrumental Music (as applied instructors are available)

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument: 4 hours

MUS 1890 Instrumental Music Studio Class: 4 semesters (as needed and available)

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

MUS 1951 Class Lessons in Voice (or 1 hour of Applied Voice*)

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

3a. Successful completion of the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam in the applied concentration area

Any additional hours in applied area will count as music electives. Any hours taken after passing the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam will be taken at the 3000-level for upper-division credit.  Four hours of upper-division credit is a requirement for performing a senior recital.

4. Choose a minimum of one additional upper-division hour in music if concentrating in voice or instrumental music

5. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan - Voice

View 4-Year Plan - Piano-Organ

View 4-Year Plan - Instrumental

*See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for minor in Theatre


The student must complete a minimum of 18 hours.

COM 2533 Oral Interpretation

COM 4273 Narrative Performance

MUS 1731, 3731 Music Theatre Methods: Drama I (two hours total)

MUS 1732, 3732 Music Theatre Production (four hours total)

THE 1112 Freshman Theatre Workshop

THE 2121 Practicum in Theatre Production

THE 3113 Theatre Workshop

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Education (B.Mus.Ed.) degree with major in Music, K-12 Certification

 

See B.M.E. degree with major in Music, K-12 Certification under the College of Education.

View 4-Year Plan - Voice

View 4-Year Plan - Piano

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Worship Arts

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by MUS 1203 in the program requirements.

2. Courses specified by this Department - 18 hours

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 1203 Liberal Arts Foundations for the Musician

MUS 2111 Musicianship II

MUS 2113 Theory II

MUS 3213 History of Music I

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 4103* Music Arranging with MIDI

3. One of the following concentrations - 9 hours

Voice

MUS 1981* Applied Voice: 4 hours

MUS 1980 Studio Class in Voice: 4 semesters

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument

Piano

MUS 1991* Applied Piano: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument

Organ

MUS 1971* Applied Organ: 4 hours

MUS 1990 Studio Class in Piano: 4 semesters

MUS 1951/61 Class Lessons in Voice (or 2 hours of Applied Voice*)

MUS 3151 Functional Keyboard Skills I

MUS 3161 Functional Keyboard Skills II

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument

Instrumental Music (as applied instructors are available)

MUS 1891* Applied Instrument: 4 hours

MUS 1890 Studio Class in Instrumental Music: 4 semesters (as needed and available)

MUS 1931/41, 2931/41* Class Piano I-IV (see other options in Piano Proficiency)

MUS 1951 Class Lessons in Voice (or 1 hour of Applied Voice*)

3a. Successful completion of the Upper-Division Applied Admittance Exam in the applied concentration area

4. Worship Arts Core - 38-39 hours

BBL 3353 Theology of Worship

BBL 3363 History of the Christian Church I

BBL 3373 History of the Christian Church II

MUS 2503 Worship Arts I: Orientation

MUS 2513 Worship Arts II: Materials and Methods

MUS 3101 Survey of Instruments

MUS 3232 Contemporary Worship Music in Theory and Practice

MUS 3323 Children's Music Ministry Methods

MUS 3563* Audio Technology I

MUS 36_1 Music Practicum: (as advised)

MUS 3951 Corporate Worship Techniques

MUS 4191* Senior Presentation Preparation

MUS 4553 Internship in Worship Arts

MUS 4920* Senior Presentation in Worship Arts

One of the following:

MUS 1731 Music Theatre Methods: Drama I

MUS 1732 Music Theatre Production

One of the following:

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

Ensemble participation: 4 hours (See Ensemble participation requirements)

5. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4Year Plan - Voice

View 4-Year Plan - Piano/Organ

View 4-Year Plan - Instrumental

*See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for minor in Music

The student must successfully complete a total of 18 semester hours comprising work in the classroom, ensemble participation, and private instruction in applied music (either private or class)-voice, piano, organ, or other approved instrument.

Required Courses - 12 hours

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 1203 Liberal Arts Foundations for the Musician

Applied Music Instruction*: 4 hours (either private or class)

Ensemble Participation: 1 hour (See Ensemble participation requirements)

Six hours from the following:

MUS 3101 Survey of Instruments

MUS 3213 History of Music I

MUS 3223 History of Music II

MUS 3323 Children's Music Ministry Methods

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 3421 Conducting II

MUS 3563* Audio Technology I

MUS 4261 Piano Pedagogy

MUS 4262 Piano Literature

MUS 4273 Organ Literature and Pedagogy

MUS 4281 Vocal Literature

MUS 4291 Choral Literature

MUS 4382 Vocal Pedagogy

MUS 4563* Audio Technology II

Please note required prerequisites for each course as specified in the course descriptions.

* See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for minor in Worship Arts

 

The student must successfully complete a minimum of 21 hours.

MUS 1000 Recital Attendance: 2 semesters

MUS 1111 Musicianship I

MUS 1113 Theory I

MUS 2503 Worship Arts I: Orientation

MUS 2513 Worship Arts II: Materials and Methods

MUS 3101 Survey of Instruments

MUS 3411 Conducting I

MUS 3563* Audio Technology I

MUS 3951 Corporate Worship Techniques

Choose one option:

A. Vocal or Piano Concentrate:

Piano Instruction-2 hours from MUS 1931*/41*/91* (Class or Applied)

Vocal Instruction-2 hours from MUS 1951/61/81* (Class or Applied)

Instrumental music instruction - one hour from MUS 1891* (Applied)

B. Instrumental Concentrate:

Instrumental music instruction-2 hours from MUS 1891* (Applied)

Piano Instruction-2 hours from MUS 1931*/41*/91* (Class or Applied)

Vocal Instruction-1 hour from MUS 1951/81* (Class or Applied)

  * See Music Fee Schedule

 

Requirements for minor in Theatre


The student must complete a minimum of 18 hours.

COM 2533 Oral Interpretation

COM 4273 Narrative Performance

MUS 1731, 3731 Music Theatre Methods: Drama I (two hours total)

MUS 1732, 3732 Music Theatre Production (four hours total)

THE 1112 Freshman Theatre Workshop

THE 2121 Practicum in Theatre Production

THE 3113 Theatre Workshop

 

DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS

(SYMBOL: ART)

The mission of the John Brown University Department of Visual Arts is to equip students with the intellectual and practical abilities required of a visual communication professional. These abilities are equally conceptual and technical.

This is a field that involves the Head, Heart, and Hand. The Department of Visual Arts strives to give students an equal emphasis on concept and technique with an overarching set of values that integrates it all.

In each of our majors the ability to think creatively and solve problems in innovative ways is a critical skill to develop. Visual artists must be thinkers, not simply decorators.

On the other hand, successful careers are not possible for students who have great ideas but have not learned the critical techniques for making those ideas reality. Visual artists must also have skills in their chosen media.

Student Learning Outcomes:


While specific skill sets vary from one media to the next, there are four common student learning outcomes:

1.   Students will demonstrate the ability to generate creative, innovative, problem-solving ideas.

2.   Students will demonstrate the ability to practice their media at a high level.

3.   Students will understand the professional practices in their field.

4.   Students will prepare a body of work that demonstrates their ability to think and create.

The Department of Visual Arts offers the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with majors in Art and Illustration, Digital Cinema, Graphic Design, and Photography and minors are available in all four areas.

All major programs require a common Visual Arts core of 15 hours and an additional 36 hours in the specialized field.

The Department of Visual Arts is housed in two state-of-the-art buildings featuring the latest equipment in two MAC labs, theatre-style classroom, painting and drawing classrooms, graphic design classrooms, photography studios, screenprinting/ printmaking studio, two traditional darkrooms and digital darkroom. Visual Arts also has two busy art galleries that feature monthly exhibits, including an annual show of "Student Works."

All of the Visual Arts degrees are highly demanding of student time, energy, and talent. The goal of these multi-faceted programs is to graduate industry-ready professionals who are prepared to step into positions which demand diverse proficiencies. All students participate in either an internship or senior project and prepare a portfolio to further aid them in their professional development. Our students are strongly encouraged to participate in foreign study and mission opportunities as a way to broaden their understanding of our world and to enrich their Christian worldview.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Art and Illustration

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by one of the following in the program requirements: ART 2153, ART 2233, or ART 2343.

2. Visual Arts Department Core - 15 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2213 Color Studies

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

One of the following:

ART 2153 European Arts and Culture

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 2343 European Art Tour

3. Art and Illustration Core - 15 hours

ART 1243 Drawing I

ART 2453 Drawing II

ART 2613 Digital Illustration I

ART 3323 Figure Drawing I

ART 3423 Figure Drawing II

4. One of the following tracks - 21 hours:

Illustration Concentration

ART 3453 Illustration I

ART 3463 Illustration II

ART 4103 Portfolio and Presentation

ART 4313 Illustration III

Three of the following:

ART 3353 Studio Art: Selected Topics

ART 3383 Oil Painting I

ART 3393 Oil Painting II

ART 3613 Digital Illustration II

ART 3643 Introduction to Printmaking

ART 3653 Screenprinting

Fine Art Concentration

ART 3233 Art History II

ART 3623 Advanced Studio I

ART 3633 Advanced Studio II

ART 4953 Capstone Exhibition

Three of the following:

ART 3353 Studio Art: Selected Topics

ART 3383 Oil Painting I

ART 3393 Oil Painting II

ART 3613 Digital Illustration II

ART 3643 Introduction to Printmaking

ART 3653 Screenprinting

Digital Art Concentration

ART 2273 3D Modeling

ART 3223 3D Modeling and Animation I

ART 3453 Illustration I

ART 3613 Digital Illustration II

ART 4103 Portfolio and Presentation

ART 4143 Digital Illustration III

ART 4253 3D Modeling and Animation II

4. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan Illustration

View 4-Year Plan Fine Art

View 4-Year Plan Digital Art

 

Requirements for minor in Art and Illustration

 

The student must successfully complete a minimum of 21 hours.

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 1243 Drawing I

ART 2453 Drawing II

ART 3453 Illustration I

One of the following

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 3233 Art History II

Six hours from the following:

ART 2273 3D Modeling

ART 2613 Digital Illustration I

ART 3223 3D Modeling and Animation I

ART 3323 Figure Drawing I

ART 3353 Studio Art: Selected Topics

ART 3383 Oil Painting I

ART 3393 Oil Painting II

ART 3613 Digital Illustration II

ART 3643 Introduction to Printmaking

ART 3653 Screenprinting

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Digital Cinema

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by one of the following in the program requirements: ART 2153, ART 2233, or ART 2343.

2. Visual Arts Department Core - 15 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2213 Color Studies

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

One of the following:

ART 2153 European Arts and Culture

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 2343 European Art Tour

3. Digital Cinema Major - 36 hours

ART 2103 Foundations of Digital Editing

ART 2113 Introduction to Cinema

ART 2123 Cinematography

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

ART 3153 Photo 3: Digital Darkroom

ART 3403 Film Theory and Criticism

ART 4163 Non-Fiction Film Production

ART 4173 Narrative Film Production

ART 4423 Internship

ART 4973 Senior Cinema Project I

ART 4983 Senior Cinema Project II

One of the following:

ART 3523 Lighting for Photography and Cinema

ART 3703 Scriptwriting

4. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan

 

Requirements for minor in Digital Cinema

 

The student must successfully complete a minimum of 21 hours.

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 2103 Foundations of Digital Editing

ART 2113 Introduction to Cinema

ART 2123 Cinematography

ART 3403 Film Theory and Criticism

ART 4163 Non-fiction Film Production

ART 4173 Narrative Film Production

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Graphic Design

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by one of the following in the program requirements: ART 2153, ART 2233, or ART 2343.

2. Visual Arts Department Core - 15 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2213 Color Studies

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

One of the following:

ART 2153 European Arts and Culture

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 2343 European Art Tour

3. Graphic Design Core - 36 hours

ART 1243 Drawing I

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

ART 2263 Graphic Design II

ART 2273 3D Modeling

ART 2303 Interactive Design I

ART 2503 Typography

ART 3203 History of Advertising and Design

ART 3263 Graphic Design III

ART 4103 Portfolio and Presentation

ART 4413 Graphic Design IV

ART 4423 Internship

Three hours from among the following:

ART 2613 Digital Illustration I

ART 3223 3D Modeling and Animation I

ART 3283 Graphic Design in Social Context

ART 3333 Interactive Design II

ART 3503 Motion Graphics

ART 3643 Introduction to Printmaking

ART 3653 Screenprinting

4. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan

 

Requirements for minor in Graphic Design

 

The student must successfully complete a minimum of 21 hours.

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

ART 2263 Graphic Design II

ART 2303 Interactive Design I

ART 2503 Typography

ART 3203 History of Advertising and Design

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Photography

1. University Core Curriculum - 52 hours

The Arts elective is covered by one of the following in the program requirements: ART 2153, ART 2233, or ART 2343.

2. Visual Arts Department Core - 15 hours

ART 1123 Computer Graphics

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2213 Color Studies

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

One of the following:

ART 2153 European Arts and Culture

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 2343 European Art Tour

3. Photography Core - 36 hours

ART 2253 Graphic Design I

ART 2463 Photo 2: Traditional Darkroom

ART 3153 Photo 3: Digital Darkroom

ART 3523 Lighting for Photography and Cinema

ART 4103 Portfolio and Presentation

ART 4133 Fine Art Photography

ART 4183 Social Documentary Photography

ART 4353 Commercial Studio Photography

ART 4423 Internship

Three of the following:

ART 2263 Graphic Design II

ART 2303 Interactive Design I

ART 3203 History of Advertising and Design

ART 3563 History of Photography

ART 3573 Alternative Darkroom

ART 4963 Senior Comprehensive Project

4. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

View 4-Year Plan

 

Requirements for Minor in Photography

 

The student must successfully complete a minimum of 21 hours.

ART 1133 Visual Art Foundation

ART 2403 Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

ART 4133 Fine Art Photography

ART 4183 Social Documentary Photography

ART 4353 Commercial Studio Photography

Six hours from among the following:

ART 2233 Art History I

ART 2463 Photo 2: Traditional Darkroom

ART 3153 Photo 3: Digital Darkroom

ART 3523 Lighting for Photography and Cinema

ART 3563 History of Photography

ART 3573 Alternative Darkroom