DIVISION OF

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Bland (chair), Caldwell, Faust, Gilmour, Holmes, Macfarlan, Song, Terrill

The Division of Engineering and Construction Management comprises the Departments of Construction Management, and Engineering,  Bachelor's degrees are offered in Construction Management and Engineering. Associate's degrees are offered in Construction Management and Electromechanical Technology. A minor is offered in Construction Management.

Mission of the Division

The mission of the Division of Engineering and Construction Management is to provide a university education integrating general studies and disciplinary studies to equip students to excel in their chosen major.

The faculty of the division seeks to educate the student in the methods of carefully and logically understanding problems and of designing solutions for those problems. Education within the division is in the context that "All truth is God's truth"; therefore, a biblical world- and life-view is the basis for problem-solving procedures. "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge." (Proverbs 1:7). A low student-faculty ratio within the division assures interaction between faculty and students on these and other issues. The curriculum and the co-curriculum prepare the division graduates to function effectively in advanced technical positions or to enter graduate studies.

Accreditation

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree with electrical/computer, mechanical, or renewable energy concentration is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.


The Bachelor of Science in Construction Management degree is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE), http://www.acce-hq.org.

Facilities

The division facilities are housed in the Balzer Technology Center that is LEED certified. There is over 40,000 square feet for classroom, laboratory, and fabrication areas. Laboratories support instruction and student design activities in thermal sciences, fluids, mechanical testing, machine design, materials science, instrumentation, control systems, electronics, and communications. A welding shop, a machine shop, and a modeling shop provide support for student projects. The Construction Management Department has a 7.000 square foot construction area and office that is used for the integrated Senior Capstone course which manages the construction of a building each year.  The Renewable Energy majors have exterior sites for study of solar and wind energy experiments.

Advisory Boards

Advisory boards for both Construction Management and Engineering are made up of distinguished alumni and other professionals. These groups give counsel on curriculum focus, professional issues, and integration of faith and learning.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available to upper-division Construction Management and Engineering students. These are supported by the Fred Olney Endowed Engineering Scholarship, the Engineering Excellence Endowed Scholarship, the Harold C. and Mildred B. Ward Endowed Engineering Scholarship, the Charles Willis Endowed Scholarship, the Robert D. Nabholz Construction Scholarship, the Milton and Leila Levy Endowed Scholarship, the National Association of Women in Construction Scholarship, the American Society of Professional Estimators Endowed Scholarship, the Jeff Scholtens Memorial Endowed Scholarship, the Barnabas (An Encourager) Endowed Scholarship (Acts 4:36), the Engineering Opportunity Endowed Scholarship, and the Dennis Schumacher Engineering Scholarship.

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

(SYMBOL: CM)

The vision of the Department of Construction Management is to prepare graduates to influence the construction management environment through a balanced application of technical expertise, ethics, stewardship, creativity, craftsmanship, work, community, and leadership. The education is provided in a Christian context that promotes spiritual growth and the development of positive character traits such as honesty, reliability, and industriousness, which result in a high level of professionalism.

Construction Management students have access to over twenty computer workstations in the department. These stations are equipped with software used for estimating, scheduling, 3D architectural design, structural design, and other construction applications. Computer applications are studied in lecture courses and are used in practicum courses on real projects. Practical experience is also given in the use of surveying equipment and applicable power tools. Seniors gain experience in managing an actual construction project.

Graduates from this department are equipped to meet the demands of the construction industry. They are found managing the construction process in both the residential and commercial sector of the industry. This program is also suited for students interested in becoming Christian missionary builders and for students interested in Design-Build. Students may choose between a Business Administration option and the International Construction option.

John Brown University is a member of the Associated Schools of Construction, and is recognized by the Arkansas Chapter of the Associated General Contractors of America, Inc., the Arkansas Chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors, and the American Institute of Constructors. The program is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE), phone: (210) 495-6161.

National Certification Exam


Graduating seniors are required to take the Associate Constructor Exam administered by the Constructor Certification Commission (CCC). The American Institute of Constructors (AIC) is the sponsoring organization and is the professional society for those working in the field of construction management.

Student Learning Objectives

a. Create oral, visual, and written communication related to construction management for a diverse audience.

b. Apply ethical principles appropriate to the profession to make informed and principled choices.

c. Analyze construction documents in order to plan, estimate, sequence, and manage the construction process.

d. Understand construction methods, materials, and equipment used in various types of construction projects.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Construction Management

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 37 hours

The Mathematics elective is covered by BUS 2193, the Physical Science elective is covered by PHY 1114, and the Social Science elective is covered by ECN 2123 in the program requirements. EGL 4003, the Life Science elective,  and the Global Studies elective are not required.

2. Construction Management Major Field - 86 hours

ATG 1163 Accounting for Decision Making

BUS 2113 Financial Spreadsheet Applications

BUS 2153 Financial Mathematics

BUS 2193 Business Statistics

BUS 4143 Business Law

CHM 1014 Fundamentals of Chemistry

CM 1112 Construction Techniques I

CM 1122 Construction Techniques II

CM 1223 Graphic Communication Skills

CM 1313 Materials of Construction

CM 2213 Construction Methods I

CM 2223 Construction Methods II

CM 2322 Statics and Strength for Technology

CM 2431 Construction Internship A

CM 2513 Surveying

CM 3213 Construction Safety and Quality

CM 3233 Structural Systems for Building

CM 3413 Estimating I

CM 3603 Mechanical/Electrical Systems for Buildings

CM 3613 Architectural Design I

CM 3623 Architectural Design II

CM 4323 Construction Contracting

CM 4423 Estimating II

CM 4613 Construction Project Planning and Scheduling

CM 4713 Construction Management I

CM 4723 Construction Management II

ECN 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics

MTH 1122 Trigonometry

MTH 1123 Survey of Calculus

PHY 1114 Fundamentals of Physics I

3. One of the following Options - 10 hours:

A. Business Administration

BUS 3153 Applied Business Ethics

CM 2441 Construction Internship B

COM 2523 Public Speaking 

MGT 2173 Principles of Management

B. International Construction

CM 2451 International Construction Internship B

ICS 2113 Intercultural Communications

INT 2183 International Management

INT 3153 International Marketing

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

View 4-Year Plan - Business Administration

View Flow Chart - Business Administration

View 4-Year Plan - International Construction

 View Flow Chart - International Construction

 

Requirements for minor in Construction Management


The student must successfully complete a minimum of 19 hours.

CM 1112 Construction Techniques I

CM 1122 Construction Techniques II

CM 1223 Graphic Communication Skills

CM 1313 Materials of Construction

CM 3413 Estimating I

One of the following:

CM 2213 Construction Methods I

CM 2223 Construction Methods II

One of the following:

CM 3213 Construction Safety and Quality

CM 3603 Mechanical/Electrical Systems for Buildings

CM 3613 Architectural Design I

 

Requirements for the Associate of Science (A.S.) degree with major in Construction Management

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 26 hours

BBL 1013 Old Testament Survey

BBL 1023 New Testament Survey

COR 1002 Gateway Seminar in Christian Scholarship

EGL 1013 English I: Composition

EGL 1023 English II: Literary Analysis and Research

One of the following:

HST 1013 Western Civilization I

HST 1023 Western Civilization II

One of the following:

KIN 1002 Wellness for Life

KIN 1012 Lifetime Fitness

Core Electives

Wellness Activity - 1 hour

Natural Science - 3 hours

Social Science - 3 hours

2. Courses Specified by this Department - 33 hours

ATG 1163 Accounting for Decision Making

BUS 2113 Financial Spreadsheet Applications

BUS 2193 Business Statistics

CM 1112 Construction Techniques I

CM 1122 Construction Techniques II

CM 1223 Graphic Communication Skills

CM 1313 Materials of Construction

CM 2431 Construction Internship A

CM 2441 Construction Internship B

CM 3413 Estimating I

One of the following:

CM 2213 Construction Methods I

CM 2223 Construction Methods II

Two of the following:

CM 3213 Construction Safety and Quality

CM 3603 Mechanical/Electrical Systems for Buildings

CM 3613 Architectural Design I

3. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

(SYMBOLS: EE, EN, ME, RE)

Engineers apply the theories and principles of science and mathematics to the economical solution of practical technical problems. There are some 25 different engineering specialties, but of the nearly 1.5 million engineering jobs available each year the greatest numbers are filled by engineers having electrical or mechanical backgrounds. More than one half of engineering jobs are in the manufacturing industries. The major part of the remainder is in engineering and architectural services and business and management consulting services. Governments employ about 200,000 engineers.  Renewable energy is an emerging technical area driven by the need to replace fossil fuels with an energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative.

Engineers in the electrical/computer and mechanical areas design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of electrical and electronic equipment, mechanical equipment, energy systems, and information systems. Renewable energy engineers will integrate both the mechanical and electrical for state-of-the-art energy developments.

Mission of the Department


The Engineering Department strives to educate students in the application of science and technology to the service of God and humanity. The goal is to produce graduates who can begin effective engineering practice in industry, graduate school, or the mission field.

Program Educational Objectives


The faculty of Engineering is committed to the following objectives which are consistent with both the university and the division mission statements and emphasize the head (intellectual), heart (spiritual), and hand (professional).

1. HEAD - John Brown University engineering graduates will have a strong general education, a broad foundation in electrical and mechanical fundamentals, and a depth of knowledge in a specific engineering discipline sufficient to ensure both immediate application and life-long learning.

2. HEART - John Brown University engineering graduates will be aware of their personal and professional responsibility to serve both God and humanity.

3. HAND - John Brown University engineering graduates will be prepared and confident to begin an entry-level engineering position, pursue graduate studies, or contribute as a Christian technical missionary.

Student Learning Outcomes


The program outcomes are published on the university web site. A graduate from the John Brown University engineering program should have

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;

d. an ability to function on multi-discipliary teams;

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems in electrical/computer, mechanical, and renewable energy domains;

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in light of a Christian worldview;

g. an ability to communicate effectively;

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues; and

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Design Emphasis


At JBU the engineering design experience starts in the freshman year, develops with more extensive technical content through the sophomore and junior years, and culminates with the two-semester senior design project. The scheme for the lower-level design courses is to introduce design methodology using small design projects that prepare the student to clearly define the problem, identify the constraints and criteria, and establish the requirements for the design. By the third year, the student will have developed the technical background to work out significant engineering design problems. The junior-level design lab provides an opportunity to work with an interdisciplinary team and produce both oral and written presentations.

Fourth year experiences include those in electronic design, machine design, and fluid system design as well as the capstone design project. The capstone project is an intense experience for the engineering student. It approaches a "real-world" situation. The projects must be finished and satisfy stated objectives as determined by active negotiation with the engineering faculty and the sponsors. Oral and written presentations are produced for this project.

Degree Candidacy


Students must apply for degree candidacy status during the second semester of the sophomore year. At this time, the student will make known their concentration of choice and complete a four-year plan in consultation with their advisor.

Certification for Additional Concentration


A student who completes all requirements for the B.S.Eng. degree with one concentration may receive an enhancement certification from the chair of the Division of Engineering and Construction Management certifying the additional work done in second concentration area by completing at least nine hours of additional course work from the second concentration's required courses (this does not include electives).

A student who completes all the common requirements for a B.S.Eng., all the required courses from two concentrations, and four electives from those two concentrations may receive a B.S.Eng. degree with double concentration in those two areas.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.Eng.) degree with Electrical/Computer, Mechanical, or Renewable Energy Concentration

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 34 hours

The Mathematics elective is covered by MTH 1134, the Physical Science  elective is covered by PHY 2114 and the Global Studies elective is covered by EN 3513 in the program requirements. EGL 4003, the Wellness elective, the Wellness Activity, the Biological Science elective, and the Social Science elective are not required.

2. Engineering Core - 78 hours

CHM 1124 General Chemistry I

CS 1113 Introduction to Computing

EE 2213 Digital Electronics

EE 2223 Electrical Circuits

EE 3313 Electronics I

EN 1112 Engineering Concepts and Design

EN 1223 Concepts in Mechanical Engineering

EN 1323 Concepts in Electrical Engineering

EN 2322 Engineering Economics

EN 3213 Engineering Materials Science

EN 3222 Design Lab

EN 3413 Linear Signals and Systems

EN 3513 International Problem Solving

EN 4113 Engineering Design I

EN 4123 Engineering Design II

EN 4323 Control Systems

ME 3113 Thermal Sciences

ME 3313 Statics and Strength of Materials

MTH 1134 Calculus I

MTH 1144 Calculus II

MTH 2114 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

MTH 2123 Vector Calculus

MTH 3183 Probability and Statistics

PHY 2114 General Physics I

PHY 2124 General Physics II

3. One of the following Concentrations

A. Electrical/Computer Concentration - 24 hours

EE 3123 Embedded Systems

EE 3323 Digital Systems

EE 3423 Signal Processing

EE 4123 Electromagnetics

EE 4413 Digital Communications Theory

Technical Electives - 9 hours from the following:

EE 3501/02/03 Selected Topics

EE 4213 Electronics II

EE 4303 Digital Signal Processing

EE 4403 Advanced Digital Systems

EE 4503 Data and Computer Communications

EN 3501/02/03 Selected Topics

EN 4303 System Design with Microprocessors

EN 4403 Engineering Management

B. Mechanical Concentration - 24 hours

ME 3123 Dynamics

ME 3223 Thermodynamics

ME 4113 Machine Design

ME 4213 Heat Transfer

ME 4323 Fluid Mechanics

Technical Electives - 9 hours from the following:

EN 3501/02/03 Selected Topics

EN 4303 System Design with Microprocessors

EN 4403 Engineering Management

ME 3501/02/03 Selected Topics

ME 4103 Advanced Strength of Material

ME 4203 Mechanical Vibrations

ME 4303 Finite Element Analysis

ME 4403 Compressible Flow

ME 4503 Viscous Flow

ME 4603 Advanced Thermodynamics

ME 4703 Aerospace Propulsion

C. Renewable Energy Concentration - 23 hours

CHM 2154 General, Organic, and Biochemistry

RE 1113 Introduction to Renewable Energy

RE 2121 Practicum in Renewable Energy

RE 3123 Bio-fuels and Biomass

RE 3143 Wind Energy

RE 3163 Solar Energy

Technical Electives - 6 hours from the following:

EE 4213 Electronics II

EN 3501/02/03 Selected Topics

EN 4403 Engineering Management

ME 3123 Dynamics

ME 3223 Thermodynamics

ME 4103 Advanced Strength of Material

ME 4113 Machine Design

ME 4203 Mechanical Vibrations

ME 4213 Heat Transfer

ME 4303 Finite Element Analysis

ME 4323 Fluid Mechanics

ME 4603 Advanced Thermodynamics

B.S.Eng. with Electrical/Computer or Mechanical Concentration - Minimum total semester hours . . .  . . . . . . . . . . 136

View 4-Year Plan - Electrical/Computer

View 4-Year Plan - Mechanical

View Flow Chart - Electrical/Computer or Mechanical

B.S.Eng. with Renewable Energy Concentration - Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

View 4-Year Plan Renewable Energy

View Flow Chart - Renewable Energy

 

Requirements for the Associate of Science (A.S.) degree with major in Electromechanical Technology

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 23 hours

BBL 1013 Old Testament Survey

BBL 1023 New Testament Survey

COR 1002 Gateway Seminar in Christian Scholarship

EGL 1013 English I: Composition

EGL 1023 English II: Literary Analysis and Research

One of the following:

HST 1013 Western Civilization I

HST 1023 Western Civilization II

One of the following:

KIN 1002 Wellness for Life

KIN 1012 Lifetime Fitness

Core Electives

Wellness Activity - 1 hour

Social Science - 3 hours

2. Courses Specified by this Department**-33 hours

CHM 1124 General Chemistry I

CS 1113 Introduction to Computing

EN 1112 Engineering Concepts and Design

EN 1121 Production Techniques Laboratory

EN 1223 Concepts in Mechanical Engineering

EN 1323 Concepts in Electrical Engineering

EN 2322 Engineering Economics

EN 3213 Engineering Materials Science

MTH 1134 Calculus I

PHY 2114 General Physics I

PHY 2124 General Physics II

** Division chair may make discretionary substitutions.

3. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

 

DEPARTMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY

(SYMBOL: RE)

NOTE: Effective October 9, 2013, the Renewable Energy degree is no longer available to new students.  Please contact your admissions/academic advisor for further assistance.

 

The Department of Renewable Energy prepares students for the challenges of designing, promoting, and implementing renewable energy systems in society's rapidly-changing energy-related industries. Energy, in its many abundant forms, is the driving physical factor upon which industrial societies are founded. Renewable energy resources include wind power, solar power, biomass and bio-fuels, fuel cells, ground-source heat pumps, geothermal resources, hydroelectric power, tidal and wave power. The Bachelor of Science in Renewable Energy will prepare students for success in these rapidly developing fields and disciplines.

The Renewable Energy Program is a cross-disciplinary program grounded in the belief that students who understand the fundamentals of science and energy conversion, its application to international sustainable development, and the business and management skills to drive this growth market can be effective agents for sustainable change. The department will draw from existing strengths in the Science, Engineering, Business, and Biblical Studies divisions to offer the Bachelor of Science Degree in Renewable Energy with two distinct emphases: Management and International Development, in addition to the renewable energy emphasis with in an Engineering degree.

Student Learning Outcomes


A graduate from the John Brown University Renewable Energy Program, management or international options, should have

a. an ability to apply knowledge from mathematics, science, and the student's chosen option area to renewable energy market needs

b. an ability to create system, component, or process applications to meet desired renewal energy needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;

c. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in light of a Christian worldview;

d. an ability to communicate effectively; and

e. a knowledge of contemporary issues related to renewable energy.

 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with major in Renewable Energy

(no longer offered, effective October 9, 2013)

 

1. University Core Curriculum - 46 hours

The Global Studies elective is covered by INT 2183, the Mathematics elective is covered by BUS 2193, and the Physical Science elective is covered by PHY 1114 in the program requirements.

2. Courses Specified by this Department - 63-65 hours

A. Renewable Energy Common Courses - 27 hours

CHM 2154 General, Organic, and Biochemistry

EN 3513 International Problem Solving

RE 1113 Introduction to Renewable Energy

RE 2113 Introduction to Energy Science

RE 2121 Practicum in Renewable Energy

RE 3123 Bio-fuels and Biomass

RE 3143 Wind Energy

RE 3163 Solar Energy

RE 4124 Renewable Energy Capstone

B. One of the following:

1) Management Option - 38 hours

ATG 1163 Accounting for Decision Making

BUS 1123 Business Communication

BUS 2193 Business Statistics


BUS 3153 Applied Business Ethics


BUS 4143 Business Law


CHM 1014 Fundamentals of Chemistry


EN 2322 Engineering Economics


LDR 3563 Organizational Leadership


MGT 2173 Principles of Management


MTH 1123 Survey of Calculus


PHY 1114 Fundamentals of Physics I


PHY 1124 Fundamentals of Physics II

2) International Development Option - 36 hours

CHM 1014 Fundamentals of Chemistry

ICS 2113 Intercultural Communications

ICS 3133 Cultural Research Methods or ICS 4183 Cultural Values Seminar

ICS 3243 Principles and Philosophy of Community Development

ICS 3263 Theory and Practice of Appropriate Technology I

ICS 3283 Theory and Practice of Appropriate Technology II

INT 2183 International Management

MTH 1123 Survey of Calculus

PHY 1114 Fundamentals of Physics I

PHY 1124 Fundamentals of Physics II

One of the following:

BBL 3303 Theology of Missions

BBL 3583 Perspectives on the World Christian Movement

3. Electives as necessary to complete minimum total hours

Minimum total semester hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

 

 

Requirements for minor in Renewable Energy

NOTE: Effective October 9, 2013, the Renewable Energy minor is no longer available to new students.  Please contact your admissions/academic advisor for further assistance.


The student must successfully complete a minimum of 20 hours.

CHM 1014 Fundamentals of Chemistry

CHM 2154 General, Organic, and Biochemistry

RE 1113 Introduction to Renewable Energy

RE 2113 Introduction to Energy Science

Two of the following:

RE 3123 Bio-fuels and Biomass

RE 3143 Wind Energy

RE 3163 Solar Energy